Bhoomi – Mother Earth

As a ceramicist, the very process of creating things using material from earth – using clay, has been a rewarding means of expression for me. This helps me connect with the soil, water, air, and fire, in a way that is very tactile and emotional.

As a culmination of the technique that I have learnt and experimented with over the years, and as a homage to the place we call our home, this sculpture is conceived as the mother earth – or ‘Bhoomi’ – a name closer to my heart. In retrospect, the fact that this lockdown had me staying indoors, reflecting and contemplating on the current state of affairs the earth has had to endure, our treatment and consumption of it’s natural resources, and the retaliation of mother earth in return – seems like a plead for a pause – a complete halt – asking humanity to stop this abuse we mete out to her. 

There has been a huge awakening in us during this brief time when nature showed us clear blue skies, clean unpolluted atmosphere revealing distant views, and waters pristine and nurturing, once again like being just born. In giving life to the Bhoomi sculpture from my perspective – she is the one who stands tall and mighty as always, but wears a skirt around her girdle that is frayed and falling apart like the maladies she suffers from – and yet she emerges out of this like having re-born with folded arms in a foetal self-hug, a submissive gesture leaning towards faith and prayer. There is a bird of hope that is perched on her shoulder, a sign of good things to come, and a harbinger of peace on earth. The birds from my garden helping me cheer up during my lockdown needed a pride of place in my conception of the mother earth, and the little bird was perhaps a suggestion of the freedom that we long for, during these trying times.

I have abstracted the Bhoomi figurine to be feminine, the facial features to be minimal, and have highlighted the textures by using rustic oxides and shiny glazes as I usually play about to bring the most out of my clay. The blues represent the skies and the flowing rivers on her body, while the contrasts of textures showing red parched earth depict the strength and fragility of the terracotta clay fired as mother earth. The glazing technique involved pouring the glaze mixture over the finished sculpture, and let it take shape as it flows, allowing gravity to determine the flow, as does the earth in the flow of rivers naturally down the mountain slopes and valleys towards the ocean.

The colours, form, and idea of the sculpture we see in the Bhoomi, is the direct result of a complete blending in of the elements of nature, my humble answer to the reality of where we live, a mere reminder of how we must take care of it, if we were to leave it behind in its healthy glory for the generations to come. 

As a ceramicist, the very process of building things up using material from earth – using clay, has been a rewarding means of expression for me. This helps me connect with the soil, water, air, and fire, in a way that is very tactile and emotional.

As a culmination of the technique that I have learnt and experimented with over the years, and as a homage to the place we call our home, this sculpture is conceived as the mother earth – or ‘Bhoomi’ – a name closer to my heart. In retrospect, the fact that this lockdown had me staying indoors, reflecting and contemplating on the current state of affairs the earth has had to endure, our treatment and consumption of it’s natural resources, and the retaliation of mother earth in return – seems like a plead for a pause – a complete halt – asking humanity to stop this abuse we mete out to her. 

There has been a huge awakening in us during this brief time when nature showed us clear blue skies, clean unpolluted atmosphere revealing distant views, and waters pristine and nurturing, once again like being just born. In giving life to the Bhoomi sculpture from my perspective – she is the one who stands tall and mighty as always, but wears a skirt around her girdle that is frayed and falling apart like the maladies she suffers from – and yet she emerges out of this like having re-born with folded arms in a foetal self-hug, a submissive gesture leaning towards faith and prayer. There is a bird of hope that is perched on her shoulder, a sign of good things to come, and a harbinger of peace on earth. The birds from my garden helping me cheer up during my lockdown needed a pride of place in my conception of the mother earth, and the little bird was perhaps a suggestion of the freedom that we long for, during these trying times.

I have abstracted the Bhoomi figurine to be feminine, the facial features to be minimal, and have highlighted the textures by using rustic oxides and shiny glazes as I usually play about to bring the most out of my clay. The blues represent the skies and the flowing rivers on her body, while the contrasts of textures showing red parched earth depict the strength and fragility of the terracotta clay fired as mother earth. The glazing technique involved pouring the glaze mixture over the finished sculpture, and let it take shape as it flows, allowing gravity to determine the flow, as does the earth in the flow of rivers naturally down the mountain slopes and valleys towards the ocean.

The colours, form, and idea of the sculpture we see in the Bhoomi, is the direct result of a complete blending in of the elements of nature, my humble answer to the reality of where we live, a mere reminder of how we must take care of it, if we were to leave it behind in its healthy glory for the generations to come. 

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